Linda Maye Adams

OPOV: The Language of Power


In RosemaryKirstein’s The Language of the Power, a steerswoman–a type of scholar–tries to unravel a mystery from the past.  The story is in a fantasy setting, but if you read the Amazon reviews, it also mixes science fiction elements.  It’s the fourth book in the series–somehow I always manage to never grab the first book!

You have to dig into the words a bit to see the omniscent point of view (OPOV).   One of the initial flags of the narrator for me were the numerous references to the main character as “the steerswoman.”  If it was being done in a more traditional third person, the character would hardly refer to herself in such a way.   Here, the one thing that stood out for me with the OPOV narrator was steadiness–the narrator really anchored the entire book.  The narrator made me, the reader, feel like I could settle down and just see what would happen.

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