Linda Maye Adams

A is for Age


I started writing when I was eight.  So, as an adult, when people asked me how long I had been writing, I proudly bragged that I had been writing for “twenty years.”  It sound terribly impressive to me, even though a chunk of that was my childhood.

Now, though, the question was posted on a message board, and instead of popping up and bragging about how long, it froze me up.  I haven’t been asked that in quite a few years, and suddenly I’m thinking, “Do I really want to mention how many decades it’s been?”  So I fudged it and just said it was more than I cared to admit.

Age is funny thing.  When we’re young, we want to feel older and give the impression of experience.  When we’re young, we don’t want people to know how old we are!

QUESTION FOR YOU:  How has your experience with age changed over the years?

10 Comments

  1. Great post! I’m on the other side of 40 and it’s ok with me. Other than the fact I feel like my body is falling apart, I like being a little older and wiser. Still always like to learn new things. I think I’m more curious about learning things now than I was when I was younger. The best part is not caring what other people think of you. That took a long time to get over, but once I did…wow…lots of added stress was gone. 🙂

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    • My grandmother always said that, about not caring what other people think. I always kept wondering when it would happen. It took a long time!

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  2. I’m kind of glad I waited to sit down and write those books I’d been thinking about for years and years because as I’ve gotten older I’ve learned to let things roll off me that would have devastated the younger me. If I’d queried a novel and received rejection letters when I was in my twenties I probably would have fallen apart. Now when I get one I think, “Aw, too bad. Maybe the next one.” And I go on querying & writing my next book. It’s just part of being an author and not the end of the world. (I also get a kick out of hearing, “You don’t look fifty!” While I’m pleased to hear that and realize it’s a compliment, I can’t help but think, “Sure I do! I’m fifty and this is what it looks like.” :))

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    • When I was in my twenties, I really didn’t understand how to generate ideas, so I would have been in trouble if I got lucky with a novel!

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  3. lindaclaire2000

    I’ll tell anyone my age (I’m 44) and feel fine about it – it’s only the physical things like the threatening of jowls and stringy-neck that remind me I’m not 17 any more! I think as the years have gone by I’ve definitely had more to write about and more to say – as well as the confidence that what I’m saying isn’t ill-thought-out rubbish. I like being in my 40s – it brings a certain gravitas. I didn’t feel like a proper adult until I hit my 30s!

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    • That is very true about experiences feeding the ideas. When I was in my twenties, they were so hard to come up with because all I had was my childhood to draw on.

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  4. Funny how things work this way, eh? I’m only a quarter of a century and I catch myself either subconsciously giving off the impression of being an older, cantankerous man or at least desiring to be one. I suppose I read The Dark Knight Returns at an impressionable time and have been shooting for that age (late 50s) ever since.

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    • Funny you mention Batman. We just had a Batman siting in Washington, DC. Police pulled over a Lamborgini and Batman — full costume — was inside.

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  5. Age is in the mind. I don’t care about age, I care about how a person thinks–are they old in their thinking or nimble and on top of things.

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  6. I don’t wanna talk about it 😉

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