Linda Maye Adams

Anatomy of a Pantser Story


All my life, people have told me, “You need to outline.”  The way I wrote mystified everyone, and they thought I just hadn’t discovered the value of an outline.  We’re not broken!  Pantsers merely have a different approach that doesn’t involve outlining.  I recently wrote a short story, and I noted the process as I went along.

The story was for a war-themed fantasy and science fiction anthology, with a short deadline.  I had five days to finish it.  I started with an existing idea.  I don’t know much about the story, other than the main character has an unusual magical skill that’s highly valued and feared.   Starting the story with so little is terrifying, but … Read the rest on Unleaded Fuel for Writers.

A wide-eyed boy on the high dive looks down at the very tiny pool below.

Welcome to my new follower, Coyotetooth13.  Check out the wonderful posted!

Please visit my flash fiction Sand Dollar Wishes on Writer Unboxed!

3 Comments

  1. Reblogged this on BookRepublic.

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  2. Zen

    Hmm. I don’t know if it’s a glitch or what, but the “Read the Rest” hyperlink redirects back to this page again.

    Otherwise, I think pantsing is a much more exciting way to write, because it lets the characters/story write itself, rather than letting us direct everything for it.

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    • Sorry — link is fixed. I do agree pantsing is a very exciting way to write, but sometimes it can be a frustrating experience too.

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