Linda Maye Adams

Rule U: have fUn when you write


We’re onto the letter U in Linda’s Rules of Writing of the A to Z Challenge, and this time it’s about having fUn.

A lot of writers come into writing novels and immediately envision that once they finish their book, someone will wave a magic wand and the book will instantly become a best seller.

A wizard works on a computer

This wizard is conjuring up a best seller on a computer. Think he can work the magic?

Well, maybe not a magic wand, but many people have this gap between the writing and the actual sale.  We all think our book is the best thing.

Then we get slapped with the reality of rejection letter after rejection letter.  And it can be very discouraging because the agents aren’t going to tell us why they rejected it, and critiquers may not give good critiques that help.

I have about 500 rejection letters.

And no, that’s not a typo.  Several hundred of those are just from novel submissions.  It’s a thankless learning process, and the only way to learn is, really to get rejected.  I was at a con, and there was writer who had won the Nebula Award, and he commented that he still got rejections.

So writers writing in the hopes of making money are going to be disappointed.  You really have to love writing because it’s the only thing that will sustain you when you get rejections.

What’s the worst rejection letter you received?

Caption: A to Z Challenge Logo

3 Comments

  1. Worst rejection letter: The one on Penguin letterhead, composed for my submission, signed by a senior editor telling me how much she loved my work…BUT…bottom line: no cigar. It was also my best rejection letter.

    It was a revelation to me, too, to realize that established authors still have to submit and sell and deal with rejections. And another revelation to realize that after publication, unless the publisher is committed to a huge marketing effort, it’s incumbent upon the author to generate buzz and arrange signings and promote the new book.

    I can only think of two rational reasons to write: because you love it, because you can’t not do it.

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    • I got one from an agent that was a personal rejection. Tough to take, especially because she was right about it. You really do have to love writing first.

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