Linda Maye Adams

If writers ruled the world


Daily Post’s writing prompt is “You’ve been given the superpower to change one law of nature. How do you use it?”

That’s a dangerous topic for a writer. We live for coming up with stuff like that and then showing how it can go disastrously wrong, and this is particularly true in science fiction and fantasy where rules can be changed for the story. Like:

Them!

Them was one my early favorite movies.  It starred James Whitmore, James Arness, and Fess Parker. It’s set in Los Angeles, and man’s dealings with radioactivity (this was the 1950s, when atomic power was new) creates giant killer ants. The army has to stop the ants before they start breeding.  The last part of the movie is set in the Los Angeles River, which is a concrete river that runs through the city.

Star Trek: The Original Series

In the episode Charlie X, a 3-year old boy is stranded on a planet, and the well-meaning inhabitants give him the ability to do, well, pretty much anything with magic powers.  He grows into a teenager who has never been socialized, and is just coming into things like attraction for girls. There’s one scene in it that still creeps me out, where a woman loses her face because Charlie gets angry at her.  Charlie ends up unable to be a part of society and goes back to live on the planet, alone.

Hopscotch by Kevin J. Anderson

In Hopscotch, a science fiction novel in the near future, people can change bodies. Sort of like an extreme form of plastic surgery. Imagine if you lost your body and didn’t know where it was. It was like the ultimate vanity, and yet, the ultimate destruction of society.

Green Rider Series by  Kristen Britain

The Green Rider series is one of my favorite book series right now. Karigan, the main character, ends up becoming a Green Rider, though she doesn’t want to, and gets the power of invisibility. An additional function of that power is time travel, which is very dangerous to her body.

Stargate SG-1

This was a long running science fiction TV series starring Richard Dean Anderson.  In “Window of Opportunity,” a grieving widower finds a device that can go back in time, so he decides to use it to relive his time with his wife. The only problem is the device puts time in a repeating loop. While the grieving scientist tries to fix it, the heroes of our story are caught in a day that keeps repeating itself. This is a fabulously written episode and well worth watching if you haven’t seen it.

Writers always dream about superpowers and how they can break. It’s more fun that way.

4 Comments

  1. That Star Gate time loop episode was fun!

    Like

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