Linda Maye Adams

Pens, Pens, Pens!


Every year, it seems like I have to clean out my accumulation of pens. Somehow, they just gravitate to my drawers, and I find them on top of tables, in pockets, you name it.  A co-worker came over looking for a pen, so I opened by drawer: “Help yourself.”

His jaw dropped. I don’t think he expected a drawer of pens.

I didn’t start out using pens almost exclusively. When I wrote short stories when I was a kid, it was always with a number 2 pencil — you know the kind, those yellow pencils that eventually got ground down to stubs.

My father had mechanical pencils he always had stuck in his shirt pocket. These were 9 mm pencils, yellow. You can still buy them. I liked those, too, and not the 7 mm ones because the lead was always breaking. What good is a pencil when you can’t write with it?

But then came the pen.

And it was the army’s fault.

Everything in the military is written in black ink. That was one of the early things that the Drill Sergeants kept telling us. I’m not sure why they were so focused on pens.

Maybe it was because pencils break. Maybe it was because ballpoint ink doesn’t smear, which pencil would do if written on paper stuck in a hot, sweaty uniform pocket.

Anyway I’d always have one of the Skillcraft pens stuck in a pocket somewhere. These were simple ballpoint pens — no caps, because caps can get lost. The pens were pretty infamous for getting lost. Someone else would pick it up and use it, and it’d disappear into a pocket. The pens would have quite a journey.

Sometimes I’d end up with one with someone’s teeth marks on the end. Used pens!

If I found one on the ground, I always picked it up and saved it for later use.

Out of the army, the black pen has become any color. I still prefer ballpoint and also gel pens over the Sharpies. Don’t care much at all for fountain pens (does that mean I’m being unwriterly?).

Sometimes I walk into the office supply store and see colored pens on sale and think, “Yeah, I’m out of pens, so let me get that.”

Then I find about five in the bottom of a coat pocket and I wonder how they all got in there.

Pens. You gotta love them.

9 Comments

  1. Interesting story! I never knew that army pens like those existed or that they’d go on little journeys. I also have way too many pens. I can’t help it! I’m always on a mission to find the smoothest, easiest, funnest pen to write with.

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    • One of the sergeants told me the Army even had a class on the Skillcraft pens — accountability of an item like a pen that is hard to keep track of.

      Liked by 1 person

      • A whole class! I guess I can believe that. 😀

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  2. I like colored pens for color coding.

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    • I can’t do color coding. I’ve tried, but I’m lucky if I pick up the same color twice …

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  3. livrancourt

    I like medium-tip ballpoint pens – the kind without the caps, because when I’m carrying one in my pocket at work, I don’t want to fuss with capping & uncapping. Hospitals require black ink too, and a medium tip gives me a smooth flow but doesn’t get messy, because I have a fairly loopy script. Outside of work, I prefer writing with pencils, because my brain goes faster than my hand, so I make a lot of mistakes.
    And that’s way more information than you needed, isn’t it?

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    • I make a lot of mistakes, too. The same kind of typos — leaving words or letters out — I do when I print. I’m always crossing stuff out!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I don’t put pens in pockets anymore, not after I washed an entire load of my husband’s dress shirts and one had a pen in the pocket I didn’t know about. Every single shirt that came out the dryer and splattered ink on it and the interior of my dryer looked like a leopard hide.

    I have the opposite problem. I buy pens ALL. THE. TIME. And when I need one, I can’t find any.

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