Linda Maye Adams

Soldier, Storyteller

World War I and Desert Storm


Over the weekend, I made my first real outing (other than grocery stores) to a lecture at the library on World War I.   It’s the 100th anniversary of WWI, the 75 anniversary of WWII, and the 25th anniversary of Desert Storm.

It was an interesting lecture, and I was also surprised at some of the similarities to Desert Storm.

But let’s start with a couple of the really cool facts of WWI:

  1. Prior to WWI, the U.S.’s army was comprised of local regiments.  Like what we had for the Civil War.  After WWI, it became a national army.
  2. We were an agrarian society before WWI started; we change to industrial afterward.

So some big society changes.

The war had been going on for some time when the U.S. entered it.  Because we did not have a national army, the government had to pull one together and fast.  The government started the Selective Service to draft soldiers.  It took about a year and half.  I’m pretty sure they were probably putting the soldiers on ships and sending them over that way (should have asked that!).

In Desert Storm, Iraq invaded Kuwait, which put them at the borders where they could invade Saudi Arabia.  The U.S. had to mobilize its military and fast.  Technology helped us be much faster than WWI.  The Army was sending over the elite forces days after the invasion, and it took until about December for enough people to be over there.

WWI was right around the time women were outspoken about suffrage.  They were viewed as radical.  But then the war started, and the women pitched in.  They were in some military roles and helped on the home front.  After the war, they became more accepted because they participated.

Desert Storm was, at the time, the largest deployment of women to war.  I remember it being new and strange … newspapers reported breathlessly on women who were leaving their children behind  … the sergeants didn’t quite know what to do with us, so they treated us like men.  The Army didn’t have any policies in place for dealing with any problems with women.  That one, of course, has been evolving over the last 25 years.  Women now can serve on submarines.

Like I mentioned above, we were farmers before WWI and after, we were industrial.  People who saw WWI grew up with horse and buggies and at the time they died, they saw jets.

Desert Storm also saw a big change there, too.  We were industrial, but knowledge work also came in to play a very large role.  We went from expensive computers that only a few could afford to people holding a palm-sized one in their hands–and that everyone has.

WWI marketed the war heavily and controlled what information got back to the United States.

So did Desert Storm, in spite of the 24 hour news cycle.  That one has done us as a society a disservice.  I just saw an article the other day about how the government censored out the violent aspects of the war.  The result is just like Star Trek brought up in A Taste of Armageddon.  Everyone expects war to be as neat and as non-violent as possible.  If one civilian is killed, the media parades it as a military failure.  War is messy.  Moreover, it needs to be messy.

It’s why wars need to end.

Finally, both wars are largely being forgotten.  We had some big WWI events just recently, and they barely got reported, and in some newspapers, not at all.  For Desert Storm, some of the veterans have actually heard people say, “That doesn’t count as a war.”

And each was followed by another war that eclipsed it … WWII for WWI and the Iraq War for Desert Storm.

World War II Women in Color


Check out these rare photos of World War II that were originally taken in color.  Color film existed at least since 1939 with The Wizard of Oz, but was still pretty rare because the technology was too new.

But the most striking thing in the photos is that a lot of them feature women.  Women did a lot of jobs during the war, including aircraft spotters, preparing parachutes, and creating munitions.

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Foot update:  I’m out of the boot and wearing structured shoes (hiking boots).  But I can only walk short distances.  It’s so pretty and nice outside and the flowers are blooming and I still can’t have a walk to enjoy them!

Soon …

Desert Storm Reunion Cruise: Cozumel


Next stop on the cruise was a place I always wanted to visit: ruins!

When we docked, I was first greeted by this sight.  On the right is my cruise ship, Freedom of the Seas.  On my left was Navigator of the Seas.  That’s the ship I took on my first cruise, so this was pretty weird.

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Then it was off to the Mayan ruins.  It was very hot out (Mexico in winter is still hot!), and a long walk to get out to the ruins.

My first reaction was, “That’s it?”  I guess I expected ruins to be more exotic, though they are what they are … parts of buildings that are crumbling.

It also didn’t help that we didn’t have a good tour guide.  He gave us all headsets to listen in to him, but he spoke almost in a monotone and very softly.  He also didn’t seem excited about he was talking about … seems like that would be a requirement for a tour guide.

Mayan Ruins against a deep blue sky and dry grass

And the obligatory beach shot.  This was overlooked by the ruins.  We could go down if we wanted to, but the stairs were very steep, so I opted for photos.

A beautiful Mexican beach

Then it was back at the end of the day for the next trip along the coast of Mexico for more ruins.

The Military Jeep


Jeeps were on their way out when I first enlisted in the military.  My motor transport operator school had us learn how to drive military trucks on one.  It was the only time I saw one; after that, it was replaced by the CUCV (pronounced CUC-V), which is like an SUV.  That was replaced by the Hummer.

So “Jeep in a Crate” caught my eye.  It was actually a scam–get people to buy the government auction lists, but there are some pictures of jeeps being packed for shipping overseas during World War II.  I wonder if the original shape was designed exactly so they could be packed into a crate and then loaded in a shipping container.

And if you want entertainment, check out the story that follows the jeep article for Nazis and flying saucers.

 

Desert Storm Reunion Cruise – Cayman Islands


I remember the Cayman Islands from when I was growing because they always had these beautiful cat stamps.  It was our first stop on the cruise so I went to Hell,  checked out turtles, and played with stingrays–all in one day!

This is Hell, which a very small town, mainly so the tourists can send postcards back saying, “I’ve been to Hell and back.”  But it’s also known for the strange limestone rock formations behind me.

Looks kind of like a lunar landscape.

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Then it was off to see the turtle farm.  It’s hard to see in the picture without anything to compare it to, but these are huge turtles.  They are easily 3-4 feet long.  The farm raises them for the meat.

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Then we hopped aboard a boat that took us out to a shallow area in the ocean where the stingrays were.  We climbed off the boat–the water was colder than it looked.  The wind was blowing good, and the currently was strong enough that I was working on keeping my balance.

The man in the photo is one of the guides, who held the stingrays while pictures were taken of us.  The stingrays were probably about two feet long and very soft to the touch.  The only thing hazardous about them was the tail, which would only be a problem if we jumped up and down and landed on it.  So I was doing foot shuffles and managed to trip over the anchor line at least once!

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Foot update:  At my last visit, the doctor said that, at 6 weeks, I was at where most people are for 8 weeks.  He has me using hiking boots around the house and the regular boot if I go out.

First time I was on hiking boots, it was a weird sensation.  It was like the floor was on uneven on one side.  That disappeared after the first day, but boy, the next few days were a big energy suck.

Next visit, I should be out of the boot entirely.

A Dearth of Reboots


Every time I turn around, it seems like there’s another reboot of something.  Like MacGyver.  I remember the show when it first aired, and it was a fun action show with an unconventional hero.

The new version?  Meh.

It just isn’t the same.

Josh Whedon talks about reboot fatigue.

You bring something back, and even if it’s exactly as good as it was, the experience can’t be. You’ve already experienced it, and part of what was great was going through it for the first time.

I think there’s a lot of truth in that.  Movie, TV, and even books are affected by what’s going on in the culture and even the news.   Some of the ideas develop out of that, because that’s what the audience is wanting to see.  So a show rebooted after twenty years would be very different than the original, not to mention not having the original actors, which also influences the series.

I get why the studios are doing reboots.  They think that if the series was successful once, it will be successful a second time.  When I was Voyage to the Bottom of Sea fandom, I wanted the series to be revived because I wanted to see more stories.  That’s, in fact, why people write fan fiction stories.  But in hindsight, that show was very much a product of the 1960s, starting out with spies because James Bond was hot, and then when that died, they went to aliens and monsters.  If someone recreated it today, it would have the same name, but that’s probably all it would share.

Better still would be if they stole ideas from the past and used them, rather than reboot.  I’d be disappointed at a reboot of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea.  I’d watch a show that took the basic idea and went in a direction suitable for today.

Please, no more reboots.

 

Moving Around in the First Draft


One of the most appalling things I’ve seen in writing is the piece of advice spoken everywhere: “All first drafts are crap!”  It’s often accompanied by the advice to write your first draft straight through and not go back and fix anything until you get to the revision.

Craft Thoughts has an article on why writing straight through and NOT editing as you write is a bad idea.

When I started writing, I eventually gravitated into moving around in the story and adjusting things as I went along.  Not revision, and not editing–but still writing creatively–and there is a difference.

And I did have to come up with rules.  Like when I caught myself getting stuck and moving back in the story to tweak sentences.  It was more busy work and didn’t improve the story … and didn’t solve the problem I was having.

That problem kept showing up.  I couldn’t identify what it was, except it caused me to stall out at certain points in the story.  So I decided to try the write straight through advice.  I thought if I could just get the first draft done, I could fix any problems on the revisions.

Bad, bad, bad.

What I didn’t realize was that so many parts of the story are interconnected that if I left something broken in the first draft, it would ripple through the entire story from that point on.  I’d get to the revision and fix the thing I’d left for later, or in one case, skipped over.  That would trigger a cascade of changes that I had to make throughout, and each of those changes triggered yet more changes.

All because I didn’t do one simple thing in the story because I’d left it for the revision.

I like the analogy the Craft Thoughts article uses:

A better metaphor might be building a house. When you build, you want your foundation to be as strong as possible or else everything else is going to be warped and ready to collapse. Sure, it’s possible to just slap up a structure as quickly as possible with whatever materials are around, and replace every single thing piece by piece, but it’s going to take a lot more work. And, frankly, you are going to be a lot more likely to say, “Fuck it, who cares if the floor is at a 20° angle and the toilet is connected to the oven? Let’s call it a day.”

If the story’s foundation is built broken, it’s going to be broken.  Why do writers do this to themselves unnecessarily?

Boot Sisters


Having started to go stir crazy, I went out to Panera today for lunch.  There was a family of four there, husband, wife, two girls.  The wife had a boot on her foot like me, but was getting around on a cane.  Clearly a little more advanced in recovery than me.

Soon …

Anyway, her boot was different than mine.  So I’m ordering from the kiosk and I feel this touch on my boot.  It was one of the little girls. She kept circling back around to check out my boot!

The origins of “Roger Wilco”


In every film with military aircraft–particularly from the 1960s and earlier–I’ve heard the pilots say “Roger Wilco.”  I never knew what it meant, but it lies in the military phonetic alphabet.

Because so much of military communication is over a radio, and often one where it’s hard to hear, it’s easy to mix up letters.  So each letter has a word associated with it that can’t be misheard.  R was always Romeo to me, but it turned out another word was universally used until 1957.  You can read about it here.

Crutches are Evil Things


I broke my foot last Saturday while I was in the Everglades and have been on crutches, no weight bearing, and with a boot.

I’ve been on them before, when I was in the military, and they don’t get any easier with time.  In fact, one of the things I learned with this round was that I get up and move around a lot.  I didn’t realize how much until I wasn’t able to do as much.

The first day I think I managed to spill something on the floor about three times, then fell in the middle of the night trying to get to the bathroom.  There’s a sharp turn from the bedroom door into a much narrower bathroom door.  Balance checks all over the place.  Yup, I’m pretty dangerous.

Exercise

I’m keeping up on my exercise, though no lower body exercises and no lower body cardio.  I’m revisiting my Jack La Lanne videos, since he was all about doing the exercise at home.  Most of them can be done with a chair, standing, or the floor, and I can substitute something else where feet are required (i.e. running in place might become swimming).

The worst places

  1. Kitchen. Hands down, it’s a horror story.  Everything that is conveniently located normally is hard to get on crutches.
  2. Did I mention I have stairs and hills? If I go outside, it’s down a flight of stairs, down another flight of stairs, down a hill, turn the corner, and down another hill.  We have a hill of doom out front that eats buses and tractor trailers and cars when it snows.

Things I’m doing

  1. Peapod for groceries. The deliveryman came last night and brought it in and set it on the kitchen counter for me. Thank you!  I was trying to figure out how to ferry the groceries to the kitchen from the door.  I was figuring I’d move the items that required refrigeration and leave the rest where they were.
  2. Next time I order groceries, I’m going to head for precut vegetables. More expensive, but I’m not trying to juggle a knife, cutting board, and crutches.
  3. Drinking water is hard! I put a glass in the bathroom and one in the kitchen so I can easily access the water.

Breakfast is smoothies, lunch is a salad, and I’m still working out what I need to do for dinner.

Writing

That’s been a little challenging.  I’m not getting as much done—think it’s just because, until I get used to the crutches, they’re very tiring.  More important that the writing is to take care of me.

 

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