Linda Maye Adams

Soldier, Storyteller

Words of Rain and Shadows


Woman seated on bench at night, with lantern.

Irinia can hear the rain talk.

But when the rain talks, the Shadow Folk come, and people die.

Her only chance to save her people is convince them she can hear the voices.  But a jealous seer has convinced the village that women can’t hear the Shadow Folk.

And time is running out …

 

Available from your favorite bookseller for $1.99.  Amazon.

Devaluing the Writer


It seems like more and more, magazines and publishers are trying to get writers to give away their work so the companies can make tons of money.  It’s always been a problem–it was common for me to run across a magazine that said “We don’t pay, but we’ll give you exposure.”

It screams that they don’t think the writer is all that important.

And this morning, I saw something along this line that floored me.

It was a workshop being given by an editor of a publishing company.  And the headline advertising it was along the lines of: “Books become best sellers because of the editor.”

Nowhere in there is the writer who created the story and learned the skills to make a good story.

Nowhere in there is that even an editor can’t turn a horrendously bad book into a best seller.

Nowhere in there is that without a writer to provide a story, the editor wouldn’t have a job.

And we’re not all that important, hmm?

A soldier and her Kevlar helmet


When I was in the Army, I wore a helmet that was made of Kelvar.  We called it a Kevlar, rather than a helmet.  Like any piece of a soldier’s uniform, it took on a second life, and there were some tall tales …

Rumors were sometimes passed down the convey lines during Desert Storm.  One of the soldiers was said to come from a convoy, removed his Kevlar and discovered a bullet hole in it.  Doubtful if it was true—if it was hard enough to lodge in the Kevlar, he would have felt the impact.

Another story that circulated—much to the chagrin of the woman soldier who was in my unit—was that she had mixed up her Kevlar with a four star general’s, so she was wearing his.  It was not true.  Trust me, she would have noticed.  Just soldier boredom.

But an interesting fact is that the material used for our Kevlar helmets, and in the flak vests was invented by a woman, Stephanie Kwolek.

Between Black and White


A woman walking in the distance, forest surrounding her.

 

Returning home from Desert Storm, Mary doesn’t recognize the place she grew up.

Or her father.  But it’s her that’s changed, too much.

Can she find herself in the past, or is who she was gone forever?

 

Available from your favorite bookseller for .99. Amazon.

View of the Blue Angels


Earlier this year, the Blue Angels were in Washington, DC, and they were doing some aerial photography—so they would be flying overhead.  The first time I heard the jet engines, which were quite distinctive, it hit me that it was them.  By the time I got to the window, they were long gone.

The second time I heard the engines, I moved a lot faster and just saw the tail end of the jets.  They move very fast.

My father sent me this video.  It’s a stunning view of the Blue Angels, taken from inside the cockpit.   Go all the way to the end and check out the names and ages of the pilots.  Not one of the pilots is under the age of 31.  Experience does count.

 

After this post, I’m going to stop doing posts every day and revert back to a 2-3 times a week.

Sky Hair


Planet rise over mountain.

Following the death of her wife, Pitarra is hoping time at an artist’s colony on another world will help restore her creativity so she can start painting again.

But it’s harder than she expects.  The other artists are jealous of her, and her only friend is one of the resident scientists.

As she struggles to regain her creativity, she discovers she is being watched.  Not by one of the artists.

By something else that will change how she thinks of her art.

 

Available from your favorite booksellers for $1.99.  Amazon.

Arlington County Fair


Today, I checked out the Arlington County Fair, and there was some interesting sightings along the way …

A cardboard poster of a blond guy advertising yard sale

The yard sale folks put this out to catch the eye of all the people walking to the fair.  Yard sale wasn’t much by the time I got there, but the sign was eye catching.  I wasn’t the only one taking a picture.

Blue and green dragon carnival ride

There be dragons, and they are my favorite color.

A pink pig with wings on the roof of a building

When pigs fly …

 

A person in a pig costume in a golf cart

Or when pigs drive …

Spiderman stands next to Camaro decked out in spiders

Spiderman’s got a hot Camaro.

The shiny chrome engine interior of the Spiderman car, decorated with black widows

Checking out the inside of the Camaro.  Awesome.

Medium shot of Linda Adams

And a shot of me on the way back.  It was a hot day out!

 

Kitten on the Dark Side


What does a kitten with the Force do?

 

Rocket to the Stars


This looks like a fun movie on NASA’s first African-American women–who were also engineers and mathematicians.   And I liked Taraji P. Henson from when she was on Person of Interest (and a war veteran!).

Navy discontinues its blueberry uniforms


Uniforms are an important part of life for both soldiers and the military.  For the soldiers, it’s what they wear, every day that they report to duty.  For the military, and especially the higher ups, it’s a way to make their mark on the service, and a very visible one, before they retire.

And usually, it’s not for the better.

Navy Discontinues Navy Working Uniform Type I Uniform

Last week, the Navy announced that they would be discontinuing their blue camouflage uniforms, nicknamed “blueberries.”

Trust soldiers to come up with an insulting nickname.

The uniform popped up when all the services were trying to show they were unique by coming up with their own camouflage (blame the Marines.  They started it).  But if you served on a ship, what good would camouflage do?

Needless to say, the uniform wasn’t much liked.  The Army also changed its uniform not too long ago.

The Army excursion into uniform change: the beret

I was still in the Army when the much hated berets were introduced.  It was a hat that never made sense.  The one we originally wore was like a square off ball cap with a brim.  Perfect for doing details and grubby work.  It wasn’t very expensive, and it could be thrown in the wash when the brim got all sweaty.   Also could be folded up and stuck in a pocket.

But beret?

It was wool and had this leather band around the bottom.  Cost a lot for a hat.  Had to be dry cleaned.  Really?  Let’s see, I went to the field and it rained for the entire week.  Then there was Desert Storm where the sweat didn’t just transfer to the hat; it imprinted.  A fussy beret would not have worked.

Somehow, no one thought about anything beyond what it looked like.

How do military personal get the new uniforms?

The military does not make the soldiers rush out and buy the new uniforms, which would be quite a hardship.  There’s a fairly long period where the old uniforms can wear out and be replaced by the new styles.

An interesting bit of trivia:  Despite being in the military for so many years, I cannot spell camouflage!  I had it three times above, and not one was spelled correctly.  It’s a very confusing word!

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