Linda Maye Adams

Soldier, Storyteller

Tag Archives: Outlining

Pantser’s Guide to Writing: You Are Not Broken!


For writers who don’t outline—called pantsers—it’s hard finding anything on how to write that doesn’t involve outlining. Author Linda Maye Adams, a pantser writer, cuts through some of the myths and may save you wasted time looking for solutions. In this guide, Linda Maye Adams addresses the issues that derail pantsers and also provides tips …

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Nano Day 14 & Pantsing 101


Unbelievably crazy day at work.  I was amazed I came home and didn’t just not want to deal with anything.  But I got some writing in anyway.  Did a little at lunchtime, too–I was thinking of grabbing more than that, but a friend joined me, and we had an interesting talk about the aftermath of the …

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Nanowrimo Day 1 & Pantsing 101


I decided to do Nano this year, for the first time, though informally.  I’m not registering on any of the sites or participating in the social parts of it.  Rather, I’m just using it as a goal to write a completed book in 30 days. The tool I’m using to write is Scrivener for Windows.  …

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Pantsing 101: 3 Things to Avoid


We had three secrets that would be helpful for the pantser writing a book without an outline, so we have to have 3 things to avoid. Avoid asking for permission This is common on writing message boards.  Writer comes on, posts a question, and it’s along the lines of “Am I allowed to do this?” …

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Pantsing 101: 3 Secrets that make pantsing easier


No one talks about it, but there are a lot of secrets that make pantsing a novel easier.  In fact, some of the secrets are dismissed by outliners (go figure) Turn off spell check That wavy red line identifying when you’ve spelled a word wrong or one it doesn’t recognize is quite disruptive.  In a …

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Pantsing 101: Story as a Direction


Not understanding story is one of the biggest reasons that a pantsed book can look terrible to a developmental editor or other writers or a publisher.  You throw everything in but the kitchen sink, including a 20-page scene that sounded cool, but fizzles out at some point. Not having a story is like being out …

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Pantsing 101: What the heck is pantsing a book?


NanoWrite is coming up in just another month, and with it will be the debate: Outliner or Pantser? I’m not sure why there’s a debate.  You write whatever way works best for you.  Period.  It shouldn’t matter. Yet, if I search the internet for pantser, I get a lot of outliners scratching their heads and …

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Why outlining doesn’t work for everyone


It took me a long time to figure out that most writing craft advice that I find in books and online assumes that you’re outlining.  It’s so common that even people who don’t outline don’t realize they’re being told to use outlining techniques. So much so that one of them periodically creeps into my writing …

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Keeping Track of What’s in the Novel


This topic’s prompted by a comment over at Dean Wesley Smith’s blog, where he is currently running a series on Writing into the Dark (not outlining).  In the comments, we got to discussing character questionnaires and interviewing characters. I don’t use either technique. I’ve looked at questionnaires and not been impressed, and character interviewing just …

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Exorcising Writing How-to Advice


Last week, I wrote about leaving the writing message boards because my writing was getting polluted by a lot of the nonsense advice being passed around.  But I’d also started pulling back from general writing advice from how-to books even before that (some writers were absolutely horrified at this.  Writing advice is a huge safety …

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