I woke up to find the fire hydrant sitting on the lawn, bits of fiberglass and headlights scattered around. That hydrant gets hit periodically, always in the middle of the night. What impressed me was that I slept right through it. Never heard the crash.

A county truck came by later in the morning to retrieve the fire hydrant and then a second one came by fifteen minutes later to put a cone on the spot where the hydrant was,

I wrapped up Write Like a Pulp Writer: Lessons From Writing a Story a Week for A Year. I planned for it to be a part of a series, so I decided on the series title as “Pantser Rebellion Writing Guide.”

The most interesting lesson learned was on time management. I’ve read the books for years (and for a while bought it into trying to find the right system to solve my problems). The time management books talk about how to manage time for your career goals from your day job. Personal time is generally treated as a nuisance on the side where you aren’t doing your goals. Sleep? Yeah, shave off an hour, do more on your goals.

Books on time management for writers talk about how to grab time in the evening or while you’re waiting for doctor appointments. Grab the Scrivener app and write while you’re standing in line at the grocery store. But neither book mashes them together–you know, managing your time when you have a day job and are writing on the side. I’m thinking that’s going to be a future book in this writing guide series.

Look for Write Like a Pulp Writer: Lessons From Writing a Story a Week for A Year to be published December 27. One of my goals for 2022 is to be more intentional about release dates.

Since I’m done a little early (and met my deadline with time to spare), the next one will be Write One Draft: How to Cycle in Your Story As You Write.

A dog with glasses sits behind a laptop, one paw on the mouse.  Cover for Write One Draft: How to Cycle in Your Story as You Write.